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Four new species of Triplophysa were found in China

  Triplophysa is an ecologically important and taxonomically challenging genus distributed in lakes, rivers, and streams of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and adjacent regions. Species of Triplophysa are distributed westward to the Aral Sea basin and across interior drainages of Baluchistan and northwestward to Western Mongolia and adjoining Russia. Recently, scientists found four new member of... more
Pore-forming protein initiates scar-less healing

  Tissue repair is a common problem during animal survival; however, scar tissue formation is a common by-product of human wound healing, which can lead to severe clinical dysfunction. Therefore, how to promote tissue regeneration and repair while reducing scar formation is an important issue.
  Amphibian skin plays an important physiological role in breathing and hydro-salinity balance, a... more
Scientists Found A New Glioblastoma Classification Method

  Heterogeneity is a basic characteristic of cancer, including intra-tumor heterogeneity and heterogeneity among patients mainly due to a variety of genetic alterations. The latter may give rise to differences in the responses to therapies.
  Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and malignant tumor of the brain parenchyma. The median survival of GBM patients is only 12–15 months, althoug... more
New frontiers in the allele-specific RNA editing research

  New frontiers in the allele-specific RNA editing research
  The regulation of biallelic gene expression is important for development in diploid organisms and is associated with several human diseases. A large class of genes has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in only one allele including random monoallelic expression, parental-specific (imprinted) expression, and sequence allele... more
Molecular mechanism of tree shrew’s insensitivity to spiciness

  Spicy foods elicit a pungent or hot and painful sensation that repels almost all mammals. Prof. LAI Ren’ group from Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and researchers from Zhejiang University observed that tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis), which possess a close relationship with primates, can directly and actively consume chili peppers, despite the deep geog... more
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